Winds of the Ross (v2)

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Antcliff
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Winds of the Ross (v2)

Post by Antcliff » Fri Oct 11, 2013 5:44 pm

It isn't that the wind hits harder here.
It isn't that our salted air is so much harsher.
It isn't that the trees can only grow
at unexpected angles, never fully flourishing

or thriving only in some elongated way
that suits the ghosts of gales. Our birds
are not more buffeted than the average gull.
But it seems so. High and low, it seems so.


v1
It isn't that the wind howls harder here.
It isn't that our salted air is so much harsher.
It isn't that the trees can only grow
at unexpected angles, never fully flourishing

or thriving only in some elongated way
that suits the ghosts of gales. Our birds
are not more buffeted than the average gull.
But it seems so. High and low, how it seems so.
Last edited by Antcliff on Sat Oct 19, 2013 12:34 pm, edited 4 times in total.
We fray into the future, rarely wrought
Save in the tapestries of afterthought.
Richard Wilbur

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twoleftfeet
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Re: Winds of the Ross

Post by twoleftfeet » Sat Oct 12, 2013 9:50 am

Sometimes, I find ths type of poem, built around negation, extremely irritating: I find myself demanding "stop telling me what it's not, and tell me what it is!!"

However, I really like this one, Seth - L5 and L6 are worth waiting for.

The penultimate line
are not more battered than an average gull.
- isn't working, for me. I think "the average" would be better.
Also (me being me) I keep seeing a "battered bird" as a "bird cooked in batter"! :shock:

Perhaps something like
"our birds are no more windswept than the average gull" ?

Geoff
Instead of just sitting on the fence - why not stand in the middle of the road?

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Re: Winds of the Ross

Post by Macavity » Sat Oct 12, 2013 10:03 am

Yes, it is only seemingly so Seth :)

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/wi ... lace-in-UK

Actually it is cities with their concrete towers - Birmingham/London - I find the wind harder/harsher.

I like 'thriving only in some elongated way', made me picture those isolated hawthorns clinging to the hills.

cheers

mac

Antcliff
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Re: Winds of the Ross

Post by Antcliff » Sat Oct 12, 2013 3:55 pm

Thanks Mac,
good to know about that bit. So it is as I suspected...you have confirmed it..Argyll + Bute with two entries in the top 4. We rock! (literally)
Such hawthorns, yes, you have it!

Thanks Geoff,
good to know about the poem and that line. Yeh, I see what you mean about "battered". It does have that rather chip-related use. :( Changing..and to "the".

Seth
We fray into the future, rarely wrought
Save in the tapestries of afterthought.
Richard Wilbur

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Re: Winds of the Ross

Post by David2 » Sat Oct 19, 2013 10:45 am

Antcliff wrote:It isn't that the trees can only grow
at unexpected angles, never fully flourishing

or thriving only in some elongated way
that suits the ghosts of gales.
I know those trees, but I'm not going to get into an argument about relative wildness. I imagine it is wilder up there where you are. More northerly. Closer to Thule. Well caught in the poem.

Cheers

David

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Re: Winds of the Ross (v2)

Post by Antcliff » Sat Oct 19, 2013 12:46 pm

Thanks, David
I know those trees
At certain spots you feel like going up to the trees and saying "Have you considered moving? This is not the best spot for you." In that Nan Shepard book (that Suzanne has mentioned) it suggests that there are trees growing horizontally in the Cairngorms. Of course Orcadians always say that they are born leaning into the wind. They can't move inland because without the wind they fall over.

Seth
We fray into the future, rarely wrought
Save in the tapestries of afterthought.
Richard Wilbur

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